LIVE REVIEW: JOHN BUTLER & FELICITY GROOM @ THE METRO THEATRE (27.04.2012)

Photo credit: Katja Liebing – Blue Moon Photography   Friday night at The Metro was an intimate affair between a man and a woman. Two Perth singer-songwriters cracked open the guitar cases and played a set of personal and stripped-back songs with little more than an impressive stage set for company. Felicity Groom performed with…

EP REVIEW: THE CAIROS – COLOURS LIKE FEATURES

The quality of the artists from Brisbane – both past and present – has often lead people to declare that there’s something in the water up north. But I like to think that acts like DZ Deathrays, Last Dinosaurs and now, The Cairos have simply had a lot of fun in the tropical sun. With…

FILM REVIEW: THE LADY

Earlier this year cinemagoers were treated to a look at life in Maggie’s farm in The Iron Lady.  Now it is time for an intimate portrait of The Steel Orchid. The Lady tells the story of the Burmese-English political activist, human rights advocate and political prisoner, Aung San Suu Kyi. Known to her supporters as Daw or The Lady,…

ALBUM REVIEW: SETH LAKEMAN – TALES FROM THE BARREL HOUSE

Life is often a hard road. There’s the one less travelled, the hard-knock life and the first train to Strugglesville. English troubadour, Seth Lakeman sounds like he’s gone down all of these and even more at the humble age of 35. However, this could have been achieved by living vicariously through others and their interesting…

ALBUM REVIEW: DAWES – NOTHING IS WRONG

American quartet, Dawes have shown that nothing is wrong with a journey through the past. They won over a score of fans with their nostalgia-tinged debut, North Hills and now with album number two they continue to wear the sounds of Laurel Canyon and the influences of artists like Crosby, Stills and Nash and Neil…

EP REVIEW: MAGIC BONES – SELF-TITLED

Amid the bust-ups, break-ups and the odd lacklustre album, today’s rock fans are entitled to scratch their heads and ask – just like B.R.M.C – “Whatever happened to my rock ‘n’ roll?” Plus, that’s not even considering the multitude of other groups that – like the odd, doomed relationship – are “on a break”. But…

ALBUM REVIEW: THE MAGNETIC FIELDS – LOVE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA

Like wine, most people mature with age. And then there’s The Magnetic Fields. The group’s tenth album, Love At The Bottom Of The Sea includes 15 of the most goofy and vibrant indie pop ditties, it’s essentially music that sounds like it was produced by a bunch of kids half the age of the American…

FILM REVIEW: CAFÉ DE FLORE

Café de Flore is a labour of love by writer/director Jean-Marc Valee (C.R.A.Z.Y). It is an account of two very different love stories – tales separated by different characters, countries and time periods. In spite of all this, an overarching feeling of loss, an intense rawness and a bittersweet tension link the two parts together….

LIVE REVIEW: CROSBY, STILLS & NASH @ HORDERN PAVILION (04.04.2012)

Photo credit: Henry Diltz   Here is a live review I wrote about the recent Crosby, Stills & Nash show as part of the Origin Blogger Competition in conjunction with Vivid Live Sydney. You could only write a 100-word review so it’s very short, but here goes:   LIVE REVIEW: CROSBY, STILLS & NASH @…

ALBUM REVIEW: JAMES VINCENT MCMORROW – EARLY IN THE MORNING

Man is not an island. Although in the case of shy Irish, troubadour, James Vincent McMorrow it looks like he actually could be. His debut LP, Early In The Morning was a highly personal process, recorded in an isolated house by the sea for six months. Here McMorrow opted to be left alone, playing, recording and flying solo. The…

ALBUM REVIEW: BARRY ADAMSON – I WILL SET YOU FREE

Most people would love to have one great band on their resume. And then there’s Barry Adamson. The former member of both Magazine and Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds, he left both these groups to pursue a rather successful solo career where he would release albums and score films. In 2012 he proves that you…